Blintzes


This past weekend, I went to my family's reunion. When you pack a house filled with Jews from all over the world, there is zero chance that you will ever utter the words "I'm hungry". The only way you will see a spot not filled with food is if it's being occupied by wine. Seriously, it's so much fun! The left overs are crazy! Well, I had the opportunity to meet so much extended family that I had no idea existed. I mean, I have a Hasidic part of my family that I've never met. I must have chatted with them for a couple of hours discovering that one works in a bakery making homemade pastries and decorating some gorgeous cakes—she has even taught classes on how to make them. Incredible!

Well, amongst all of the delicious bites, my cousin Rhonda who so graciously hosts this reunion so coined the Bilke Bash every five years has been compiling an archive of Jewish recipes. Well, after stuffing my face with her blintzes, I asked if it would be ok if I shared her recipe. With the green light, I snapped a few photos and now have it here for you below. Thanks, Rhonda!


1. TO MAKE THE CREPE-LIKE PART OF YOUR BLINTZES. in your stand mixer on a medium-low speed, combine your flour, eggs, milk and butter until you have a smooth even.

Over medium heat, heat your frying pan.

Coat it with a little butter.

My cousin says: "You want the pancakes to be paper-thin, so rather than pour in the batter and let it spread to the sides, you pour in a small amount and twist the pan around so that the batter moves to the sides. (It's all in the wrist!) Quickly pour in a little more, and a little more until you have a thin circular crepe.

Use your spatula to turn the pancake over when it's 'dry' on the top. Since it's so thin, the crepes just take a couple of minutes each to make." 

Repeat this process until you've gone through all of your batter.

Set aside.

 

2. TO MAKE YOUR FILLING. in your stand mixer (or mixing bowl), combine your farmer's cheese, cream cheese, egg yolk, sugar and cinnamon (optional).

 

3. TO ROLL YOUR BLINTZES. In my cousin's words: "Place a couple of spoonfuls of filling towards one end of a (cooled) pancake, and roll up. The ends are generally left open.

You should have about a dozen polachintas [aka Hungarian Blintzes], which can be served warm or cold, with or without sour cream or apple sauce."